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Remembrances from War Years

Remembrances from War Years

An alumna who studied engineering shares a few memories

Military Family

Military Family

For three of my four years at U.Va., I dated my future husband, Greg, who was then a midshipman at the Naval Academy. Despite this distance and military

Building a School in Ethiopia

Building a School in Ethiopia

Forty years ago I arrived in Ethiopia to work with the Peace Corps as part of their Rural Development Program. Ethiopia was at that time, and unfortunately remains today,

Katie Couric Helps Dedicate Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center

The Way We Were: The ’20s and ’30s at U.Va.

The Way We Were: The ’20s and ’30s at U.Va.

Constance Page Daniel—whose father was mathematics professor mathematics professor James Morris Page, dean of the faculty—grew up on Grounds and earned an undergraduate degree from

New & Notable

More Than Good Intentions: How a New Economics Is Helping to Solve Global Poverty Dean Karlan (Col ‘91) and Jacob Appel Dutton Adult A behavioral economist and an aid worker

All Things to All Boys

All Things to All Boys

Hannah Pittard

Hannah Pittard’s (Grad ‘07) novel The Fates Will Find Their Way begins with a mystery: 16-year-old Nora Lindell is missing. There are no concrete clues about her

At History’s Elbow

At History’s Elbow

An alumnus travels back to Japan where he fought on the USS Missouri

Global Network

With more than 225,000 alumni and parents around the world, the University exists as a global community. Staying in touch, staying active and staying involved are facilitated by the UVaClubs

Sidearm Sizzler

Sidearm Sizzler

Javier Lopez Photo Copyrighted by S. F. Giants

Game Two of baseball’s World Series, eighth inning, two outs, a runner on second. The Texas Rangers, trailing the San

News Briefs

News Briefs

Bang for the Buck

The University retained its No. 3 ranking for the fifth time in six years in Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine’s “100 Best Values in Public Colleges”

Bookmarked

Bookmarked

You made history, now you can write it. Celebrate the legacy of women at the University with a collaborative online history. Which professor most influenced you? How did your

Letters to the Editor

‘Absolute Gem’

The article about President Sullivan (“Welcome President Sullivan,” Winter 2010) captured her so well I felt as if I were there at the University. I’m hoping I

Women at the University of Virginia

Women at the University of Virginia

How women fundamentally changed what once was known as a "Gentleman's University"

Tending the Vines

Tending the Vines

An alumna's perspective: As the seasons change so does the labor of caring for vines and making wine.

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HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Sounds of the City

    Architecture professor Karen Van Lengen launches a virtual library of New York City sounds.

  • More than a Museum

    Through its various university and community programs, the Fralin Museum of Art curates a spirit of collaboration.

  • Stories Evil Tells

    Professor Alon Confino offers his thoughts on how humans use stories to explain our history and justify our motivations for doing things—the good things and especially the bad ones.

  • Capital Replacement

    Here’s how 16 intricately carved blocks of marble—each weighing more than three tons—were swapped out.

  • Pass It On

    The Virginia Alumni Mentoring program matches students who are interested in a certain profession with graduates who are established in that field.

  • Difference Maker: Rob Marsh

    Since leaving a career in the U.S. Army, Rob Marsh (Col '78) has devoted his life to serving as a country doctor in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley.

  • The Pioneer

    Bernard Mayes had a long list of achievements before he even came to U.Va. But on Grounds, he is perhaps best remembered as a Cambridge gentleman in a tweed jacket who broke down barriers for gay students and colleagues alike.

  • Charlottesville A to Z

    A look beyond well-known favorites like Monticello and the Rotunda reveals some of the smaller, more unexpected things that make Charlottesville and the University so special.