Notices sorted by graduation date.

David Barhydt Marshall (Col ’40, Law ’42 A/M) of Charlottesville died June 7, 2009. He was a judge of the Charlottesville General District Court from 1973 until 1985. Survivors include his wife, Ann F. Marshall (Educ ’41 A/M).

Joseph Norwood Myers Sr. (Law ’40 A/M) of Indianapolis died April 6. 2009. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and was awarded the Air Medal, French Croix de Guerre with palm, Médaille de la France Libérée, seven battle stars and the Indiana National Guard Commendation Medal. He practiced law in Indianapolis and was general counsel for the Indianapolis Legal Aid Society until 1950, when he was called to serve in the U.S. Army in Korea, where he earned two battle stars. On his return, he assumed the bench of Municipal Court Room 1, where he served for nearly 35 years. Judge Myers became the president and director of the Indianapolis Legal Aid Society.

Frederick Gerdes Wikander (Col ’40 A/M) of Eugene, Ore., died March 30, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Mr. Wikander was a geologist and worked for the U.S. Department of Energy.

John Joseph Haggerty Jr. (Col ’41 A/M) of Raleigh, N.C., died March 25, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Mr. Haggerty was a lumberman for 70 years, serving as president and later as chief executive officer of Williams Lumber Company of North Carolina.

Lawrence Peyton Harris (Com ’41 A/M) of Newport News, Va., died June 13, 2009. He served in the military during World War II and received two Silver Stars, the Presidential Unit Citation and Republic of China Medal of Valor.

Charles Hibbard Jr. (Col ’41) of Vancouver, Wash., died May 22, 2009. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Mr. Hibbard was a meteorologist and worked for the U.S. Forest Service as a weather forecaster.

E. Hadley Stuart Jr. (Col ’41 L/M) of Longmont, Colo., died May 9, 2009. He worked for Carnation Milk Co. and became a cattle rancher on the Diamond Dragon Ranch in Idaho.

Robert Paul Englander (Engr ’42 L/M) of Richmond, Va., died April 16, 2009. At the University, he was a member of the boxing team and played football. He was a member of T.I.L.K.A. and the IMP Society, served on the Honor Committee and was elected to Omicron Delta Kappa, a national leadership fraternity. He was a member of the Trigon Engineering Society and lived on the East Lawn. Mr. Englander had a long career in life insurance, serving as a general agent for Southwestern Life Insurance in Charlottesville at the Englander Agency. He was a former trustee of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and past president of the Board of Managers of the Alumni Association. He was also a past president of Martha Jefferson Hospital. Survivors include a son, Robert Paul Englander Jr. (Col ’71); and a grandson, Robert Oxford Englander (Col ’97 L/M). Memorial contributions may be made to the University of Virginia Alumni Association, P.O. Box 400314, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4314.

Henry Lee Kinnier (Engr ’42 L/M) of Charlottesville died May 6, 2009. He was a member of the Seven Society. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Navy. Mr. Kinnier was a professor of civil engineering at the University from 1946 to 1984 and, upon his retirement, was named professor emeritus. His honors include the University of Virginia Alumni Association Distinguished Professor Award, the Raven Award, the IMP Faculty Award, the Mac Wade Award and the Distinguished Service Award of the Virginia Engineering Foundation, on whose board he served. He served on the state board of engineering examiners. The Henry L. Kinnier Professorship in Civil Engineering was established in 1989 and one of his former students anonymously established an endowment fund for the Henry L. Kinnier Scholarship for undergraduate students in civil engineering. Survivors include daughters Anne Kinnier Driscoll (Educ ’70 L/M) and Elizabeth Kinnier Hiles (Educ ’72, ’74 L/M); a son-in-law, Irving Sears Driscoll Jr. (Educ ’70, ’79 L/M); granddaughters Sarah Kinnier Huitt (Col ’98 L/M) and Frances Elizabeth Hiles (Col ’05 L/M); and a grandson, Sears Driscoll III (Col ’97, GSBA ’06 L/M).

James Irvin Butzner (Col ’42) of Lake Junaluska, N.C., died May 5, 2009. He worked as a chemical engineer for Mobil Oil Co. for 40 years. Mr. Butzner was the first chairman of the Gloucester County, N.J., Community College board of trustees when it was founded in 1968 and served on New Jersey’s State Board of Higher Education. Many members of the Butzner family attended U.Va., including Mr. Butzner’s siblings and his father, John Decker Butzner (Med 1903). Survivors include a nephew, John Decker Butzner III (Med ’76 L/M).

Edgar Lee Crumpacker (Med ’42) of Roanoke, Va., died May 13, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. For 30 years, Dr. Crumpacker practiced at the Greenbrier Clinic in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.

Lane Ameen (Col ’43, Med ’46 L/M) of New Haven, Conn., died June 13, 2009. He served in the U.S. Army and was a psychiatric consultant and practitioner for the Veterans Health Administration. He was an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Yale University and a fellow at Jonathan Edwards College, a residential college at Yale. He was also a practicing psychiatrist and medical director and chief executive officer of a private psychiatric hospital. Beginning in 1980, Dr. Ameen became a consultant to the government of Kuwait, working with Kuwait University to set up a psychiatric department and psychiatric hospitals.

Benjamin Weems Dulany (Col ’43) of Washington, D.C., died May 28, 2009. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. Mr. Dulany was a member of the Seven Society. He became a partner in the law firm of Jackson & Campbell, where he practiced for more than 50 years.

James Drummond Erskine III (Col ’43 L/M) of New York City died March 21, 2009. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Mr. Erskine was employed by the Firestone Plantations Co. in Liberia and later became associate managing director of the foreign editions of Guideposts magazine. He was an actor and appeared numerous times on New York stages and in more than 75 films and television ads. He often portrayed Abraham Lincoln and made regular appearances on the Late Show with David Letterman parodying an aging Regis Philbin.

William Halder Fisher (Grad ’43, ’45 A/M) of Columbus, Ohio, died May 18, 2009. He worked as a chemist, teacher and Works Progress Administration supervisor during the 1930s, later serving as an economist for the Federal Reserve Bank from 1943 to 1956. Mr. Fisher taught at the University of Delaware before returning to Washington, D.C., to join the Federal Trade Commission in the 1950s. He worked in private business and for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce before moving to Columbus, where he was a consultant and a senior research economist with the Battelle Memorial Institute.

William Cabell Garbee Jr. (Col ’43, Law ’49 L/M) of Richmond, Va., died April 16, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and remained in the Naval Reserve until 1981. Mr. Garbee served as assistant attorney general for the Commonwealth of Virginia from 1976 to 1979. He was president and vice president of the Cabell Foundation, an association of descendants of Dr. William Cabell. Survivors include a brother, Robert H. Garbee (Arch ’53 L/M).

Richard Peters (Col ’43 A/M) of Charlottesville died June 2, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and the Korean War. Mr. Peters spent his business career in the investment industry in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., starting with the firm of Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Bean in 1947 and retiring as a vice president of the National Association of Securities Dealers. He was also director of the executive committee of the Steel Heddle Manufacturing Co. in Greenville, S.C. Survivors include daughters Elizabeth Peters Dudley (Col ’78) and Sarah Peters Du Bose (Educ ’81 L/M).

William Henry Sanders II (Law ’43, ’48) of Charleston, W.Va., died June 3, 2009. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II and received a Purple Heart, a Navy Cross and a Bronze Star. After the war, Mr. Sanders served two years as an assistant staff secretary to the staff of U.S. military governor Gen. Lucius Clay in Berlin, Germany. During his years of practice with Sanders, Austin, Swope & Flanigan, Mr. Sanders championed human rights and was president of the Mercer County Human Rights Council.

S. Cabell Shull (Grad ’43 A/M) of Oxford, Miss., died March 3, 2008. He was a retired professor of economics at the University of Mississippi in Oxford and had worked for the U.S. government in the diplomatic service.

Lewis Benton “Bud” Stevens Jr. (Educ ’43, ’48 L/M) of Charlottesville died June 13, 2009. He attended the University on a football scholarship. He served in the military during World War II and received the Purple Heart, Bronze Star and the French Croix de Guerre. Mr. Stevens began his teaching career in Clifton Forge, Va., then taught English at Norview High School in Norfolk, Va., until his retirement in 1985. Mr. Stevens served as president of the Norfolk Education Association and established a committee to allow African-American teachers admittance into the association. He was a member of the National Education Association, Phi Delta Kappa, Delta Upsilon and was president of the Virginia Association of Classroom Teachers.

Louis M. Wellford (Col ’43 A/M) of Waukesha, Wis., died May 23, 2009. At the University, he was a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. For 30 years, Mr. Wellford worked for the Waukesha Freeman, where he was in charge of the circulation department or the printing plant. He served as president of the Saylesville School Board and was a member of the International Circulation Managers Association.

Peggy Marie Bishop Turner (Nurs ’45, Educ ’49) of Charlottesville died June 9, 2009. She spent her 56-year nursing career at the University of Virginia Medical Center. Ms. Turner served on the Charlottesville-Albemarle Community Mental Health Services Board and was president of the Volunteer Services Council for Western State Hospital in Staunton, Va. The Charlottesville Business and Professional Women’s Club named her its Woman of Achievement in 1975. She enjoyed a second career as a water aerobics instructor at Smith and Crowe pools for 20 years. Survivors include a daughter, Sallie Turner Watson (Nurs ’73 L/M); and a grandson, Christopher Turner Watson (Col ’04).

Robert J. Douglas (Col ’47 A/M) of Mason City, Iowa, died March 26, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and the Naval Reserve for 20 years. Mr. Douglas joined his father at Douglas Insurance, where he worked for more than 40 years. He was chairman of the Cerro Gordo County Democratic Party, president of the Cerro Gordo County Tuberculosis and Health Association, a member of the Mason City Airport Commission, treasurer and president of Cerro Gordo Independent Insurance Agents and president of the Mason City Chamber of Commerce.

Louise Kuhn Aylor (Nurs ’47 A/M) of Madison, Va., died Oct. 27, 2008. She was a registered nurse for the Virginia Department of Health and a member of the Orange County Rescue Squad. In 1963, Ms. Aylor was one of the founders of the Madison Rescue Squad. The lobby of the Madison County Health Department was dedicated in her honor in 2008.

James Madison Barr III (Law ’47 L/M) of Hot Springs Village, Ark., died June 10, 2009. He practiced law in Charlottesville and served on the Charlottesville City Council from 1948 until 1952. Mr. Barr then had a 40-year career as a Unitarian Universalist minister and was instrumental in the building of the First Unitarian Church of Memphis, Tenn., known as “The Church of the River.”

Leonard Goodman (Col ’47) of Norfolk, Va., died May 5, 2009. He played baseball at the University in 1944 before serving in the U.S. Army. Mr. Goodman worked at the Goodman Electric Supply Co., then at Shoney’s of Tidewater until he retired as its chief executive officer in 1995.

Briscoe Baldwin Guy (Engr ’47 L/M) of Richmond, Va., died May 18, 2009. He served in the U.S. Army. At the University, he was president of Alpha Tau Omega social fraternity and a member of Trigon Engineering Society. A licensed engineer and surveyor, he worked for Stone & Webster, and then Conquest, Moncure & Dunn, where he became president and chairman of the board emeritus. He was a former president of the Richmond chapter of Associated General Contractors of America, the Richmond chapter of the Construction Specifications Institute and the Engineers Club.

Frances Jane Dennen Miller (Nurs ’47 L/M) of Elkton, Va., died Dec. 30, 2008. She worked in a family medical practice with her husband, Dr. Charles S. Miller.

George C. Rawlings Jr. (Law ’47) of Fredericksburg, Va., died April 22, 2009. He was an attorney and was active in Democratic politics. He was elected to Virginia’s House of Delegates in 1963.

Jack Philip Cook Sr. (Col ’48 L/M) of York, Pa., died May 17, 2009. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Mr. Cook was the former chairman of Bon Ton Foods and Bon Ton Food Products in Washington, D.C. He was the founder of C-P Flexible Packaging and co-founder of Shultz Foods. He served on numerous private and corporate boards, including Mellon Bank and Massanutten Military Academy. He was also founder emeritus of the Janus School in Mount Joy, Pa.

Leonard Flippen Jones (Law ’48) of Charlottesville died April 14, 2009. He served in the military during World War II. Mr. Jones was the commonwealth’s attorney for Fluvanna County, Va., having previously served in a similar capacity in Campbell County, Va. Memorial contributions may be made to the U.Va. Health System, Department of Neurology, P.O. Box 801018, Charlottesville, VA 22908.

William Frederick Lyle Jr. (Com ’48 L/M) of Lavonia, Ga., died Feb. 28, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy. Survivors include a brother, Robert F. Lyle (Col ’51, Law ’56 L/M).

John G. Murray Jr. (Col ’48, Med ’52 A/M) of Buford, Ga., died June 1, 2009. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Dr. Murray joined his father’s general practice in Greenville, S.C. He also had practices in Blue Hill, W.Va.; and Charleston, S.C.

Henry Tompkins “Duffy” Rathbun (Law ’48) of Washington, D.C., died March 19, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He practiced law with Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering and helped establish the firm’s banking law practice. During the 1970s, Mr. Rathbun worked on the reorganization of the debt-ridden Penn Central Transportation Co. into the government-backed Conrail system. With his wife, he ran a Thoroughbred breeding and racing operation and owned a 40-acre farm called Fay Gate in Middleburg, Va.

Thomas Chalmers Ruff (Law ’48) of Charlotte, N.C., died April 13, 2009. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Mr. Ruff practiced with the law firm of Whitlock, Dockery, Ruff & Perry in Charlotte, now Ruff, Bond, Cobb, Wade & Bethune. He was vice chairman of the Charlotte Zoning Board of Adjustment and was county attorney of Mecklenburg County for nearly 20 years.

Robert C. Cervak (Educ ’49 A/M) of Crete, Ill., died March 27, 2009. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Mr. Cervak spent 37 years as a teacher, coach and administrator; most notably, he served as athletic director of Crete-Monee High School and then division chairman for the Rich Township High School District.

Andrew Boyd Claytor III (Com ’49 A/M) of Bedford County, Va., died May 23, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Mr. Claytor was the owner and operator of Southern Flavoring Co., Holiday Co. and their subsidiary corporations. He was a founding director of Liberty Bank of Bedford and Giftco Inc. of Chicago. He also owned and operated Cloverlea Farm in Bedford County, which was donated to Lynchburg College and is now the Claytor Nature Study Center.

William M. Graham (Col ’49 A/M) of Falls Church, Va., died June 28, 2009. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He worked at the Federal Reserve Board and later the American Trucking Association as a cost analyst and transportation economist. He was a member of the Arlington County School Board in the late 1960s and a cost analyst with the U.S. Postal Service for 20 years. Mr. Graham led the Arlington County Democratic Committee from 1961 to 1963 as the party moved away from its segregationist legacy; he received the Washington Evening Star’s Cup Trophy for Outstanding Civic Service for his work in that position.

John Izard (Law ’49 L/M) of Atlanta died July 10, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. At the University, he was editor in chief of the Virginia Law Review and a member of the Order of the Coif. Mr. Izard joined the law firm King & Spalding in 1949 and became a partner in 1952. He served as president of the Atlanta Legal Aid Society. He was also a member and served as chairman of the antitrust section of the American Bar Association. President Jimmy Carter appointed him to serve on the National Commission for the Review of Antitrust Laws and Procedures. Mr. Izard was a member of the Administrative Conference of the United States and served on the board of directors for several public and private corporations. He was a member of the University of Virginia Law School Foundation. Survivors include sons John Izard Jr. (Col ’82 L/M) and D. Bailey Izard (Col ’85 L/M) and a cousin, W. Bolling Izard (Col ’49 L/M).

C. James Jessee Jr. (Col ’49, Law ’54 L/M) of Marietta, Ga., died June 14, 2009. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. At the University, he was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He was recalled to active duty during the Korean War. He practiced law and, in 1959, moved to Atlanta to specialize as a trial lawyer. He was active in professional and civic organizations, including the Sandy Springs Planning Commission.

Bridger P. Little Jr. (Med ’49) of DeKalb, Texas, died April 2, 2009. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He was an emergency room doctor serving in Mount Pleasant, Clarksville, Paris and Texarkana, Texas.

John A. Rogness (Med ’49 L/M) of Lexington, Ky., died May 4, 2009. He served in the U.S. Air Force for nine years. He interned and was a resident at Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C., before practicing obstetrics and gynecology in Cleveland, Tenn., for more than 30 years.